CRASC ASSESSMENT SERVICES

EXPERTISE & PROVEN RESULTS

CRASC is a collaborative organization of over 31 municipalities in Alberta that work together to provide comprehensive and high-quality property assessment services. Our team of qualified assessors uses standardized and transparent methods to ensure that assessments are fair, consistent, and accurate.

Our mission is to provide effective, reliable, and cost-efficient assessment services to our member municipalities. We strive to use the latest assessment techniques and technologies to deliver the best possible results to our members.

PROPERTY ASSESSMENTS

CRASC provides property assessments for residential, farmland, commercial, and industrial properties based on market value. The assessments are conducted using standardized methods to ensure consistency and accuracy.

RESEARCH & DATA COLLECTION

CRASC collects and maintains a comprehensive database of property information, including property values, land use, and property characteristics. This information is used to support property assessments and other services.

ASSESSMENT REVIEWS & APPEALS

Property owners have the right to request a review of their assessment and to appeal their assessment if they disagree with the results. CRASC provides an appeal process that is fair, transparent, and responsive to property owners’ concerns.

CRASC MEMBERSHIP OVERVIEW

CRASC provides municipalities with leading-edge assessment services and accessible records and comprehensive up-to-date information for municipal administrators and property taxpayers.

The limited number of assessment appeals filed with the member municipalities is a strong indicator of the high level of assessment services provided.

Working with our member municipalities CRASC assembles trained Assessment Review Board Service (ARBS) panelists and, when a complaint is filed, facilitates the necessary complaint hearing.

  • Annual total valuation update of the assessment

  • Assessment roll updates for development permits

  • Annual 20% selective assessment review/inspection

  • Assessment audit and equalization

  • Maintenance of computerized database

  • Representation at Open House & Assessment Review Board hearings

  • Supplementary assessments upon request

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HOW CAN CRASC HELP YOU?

COST SAVINGS

Rather than having to establish their own assessment departments, member municipalities can save on costs by pooling their resources and sharing the expenses associated with property assessment.

EXPERTISE

CRASC has a team of qualified assessors who are trained to determine the market value of properties across Alberta. By being a member of CRASC, municipalities can benefit from the expertise of our professionals and ensure that their assessments are accurate and consistent with industry standards.

EFFICIENCY

By having a centralized assessment authority, member municipalities can streamline the assessment process and reduce the amount of time and effort required to complete assessments.

FAIRNESS

CRASC uses a standardized and transparent approach to property assessment, which helps to ensure that assessments are fair and equitable for all property owners in the region.

DATA SHARING

CRASC provides member municipalities with access to a wealth of data and information related to property assessments. This can help with making informed decisions about land use planning, taxation, and other matters.

Join CRASC NOW

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OUR VALUED CLIENTS

“As a Participant Member, CRASC took the pressure out of our hands from the time an appeal is received, scheduling and conducting the appeal, and delivering the appeal decision. CRASC is very professional and strive to develop positive relationships and keep their members informed.”

Parkland County

HOW ASSESSMENTS WORK

Assessment is the process of assigning a dollar value to a property for taxation purposes. It is the cornerstone of municipal financing as it represents the base upon which budgets are built. A tax rate is applied to a property’s assessed value to determine taxes payable. Although assessment and taxation impact each other, each is a distinct and independent process. All activities associated with assessment and taxation are governed by the Municipal Government Act. Assessors are professionally certified and receive training in property valuation techniques, legislation and quality assurance. Every municipality must appoint, by bylaw, a designated assessor. An assessor must hold one of the following designations:

  • Accredited Municipal Assessor of Alberta (AMAA)
  • Certified Assessment Evaluator (CAE)
  • Accredited Appraiser Canadian Institute (AACI)

DATA COLLECTION & PROPERTY INSPECTION

Accurate property value assessments are made through the collection of data such as blueprint information, field inspections, phone calls and Request for Information mailouts. The type of information collected depends on the type of property. For residential properties, assessors look at photos of the property, lot size, location, house size, quality of construction, age, quality of maintenance and other features such as number of bathrooms, number of fireplaces, basement finishes, etc.., garages and other outbuildings. For income producing properties, data on rental rates, vacancies, expenses and capitalization rates are collected. All data are maintained on a CAMA (computer assisted mass appraisal) system. Land title transactions (sales) are recorded in the database. Contracts require 20% rotational cycle each year with daily data backups performed.

ASSESSMENT CLASSES

  • CLASS 1 – RESIDENTIAL

  • CLASS 2 – NON-RESIDENTIAL

  • CLASS 3 – FARMLAND

  • CLASS 4 – MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT

WHAT IS ASSESSED?

  • Parcels of Land

  • Lots, blocks, or plans shown on a plan of subdivision and registered at land titles

  • Quarter sections of land or any other area of land described on a certificate of title

  • Improvement

  • Structures

  • Designated manufactured homes

  • Machinery and equipment

  • Parcels of land and the improvements to it

WHAT IS NOT ASSESSED?

  • Personal Possessions

  • Publicly owned infrastrctures

  • Property on Indian reserves and Metis settlements

  • Growing crops

  • Fences

MARKET ANALYSIS

In Alberta, most property is assessed on the basis of ‘market value’, which is considered to be the fairest and most equitable way to assess the property. Market value is defined as the price a property might reasonably be expected to sell for if sold by a willing buyer after appropriate time and exposure in an open market.

Three approaches are used to determine a property’s market value:

DIRECT SALES COMPARISON
Also known as the market approach, this method determines the value of a property by comparing it to similar properties that have recently sold in the same area. The sales comparison approach considers factors such as location, size, condition, and other features to determine a property’s market value.

COST APPROACH
This method determines the value of a property based on the cost of replacing or reproducing it, less any depreciation or obsolescence. The cost approach is often used for new or unique properties that have no comparable sales data.

INCOME APPROACH
This method determines the value of a property based on the income it generates, such as rental income. The income approach considers factors such as the property’s current and potential income, expenses, and other factors that may affect its value.

REGULATED ASSESSMENT

Regulated property is not assessed on market value and instead uses rates and procedures prescribed by Municipal Affairs to calculate assessed values. Regulated Property includes farmland, linear property (ex. pipelines, electric power systems, telecommunication systems), and railways.

MASS APPRAISAL

Mass appraisal is the process of estimating the value of a group of properties as of a given date using common data, mathematical models, and statistical tests. Mass appraisal focuses on an entire class of properties, not on an individual property. This allows assessors to accurately value a large number of properties in a short period of time.

ASSESSMENT AUDIT & NOTIFICATION

Once all assessments are completed, the assessment information is uploaded to the provincial database (ASSET). Preliminary audit tests are conducted to ensure assessments meet requirements in regulations. Once a passing grade is achieved, assessments can be sent to the municipality.

Municipal Government Act requires an assessment roll, which is a listing of all assessable properties in a municipality and their assessed values, to be produced by February 28 of each year. The assessment roll is open year-round for inspection by any taxpayer of the municipality

Assessment notices are sent to property owners to tell them about the assessment of their property. Every property listed on the assessment roll receives an assessment notice, even if it is exempt. The municipality must publish notification in one issue of a local newspaper that notices have been mailed.

CORRECTIONS & APPEALS

Property owners have a right to voice concerns about their assessment and municipalities should encourage property owners to contact their assessor first to discuss the assessment. The Municipal Government Act, section 305, allows the assessor to correct an error in the assessment for the current year only. Upon correction, an amended assessment notice must be sent to the property owner.

A ratepayer may file a complaint with the Assessment Review Board if they are unable to come to an agreement with their assessor. Created, empowered and staffed according to the Municipal Government Act, Assessment Review Boards hear complaints for all types of property assessments except Linear properties. LARB (Local Assessment Review Board) deals with residential and farmland, while CARB (Composite Assessment Review Board) deals with non-residential, multi-family property. Like a Court, these Boards can order something to be done, such as changing an assessment on a property. Member municipalities have the option to administer assessment complaints on their own, or participate in the CRASC joint ARB initiative.

FOR APPEALS VISIT OUR ASSESSMENT REVIEW BOARD PAGE

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